Canadian Lesbian + Gay Archives

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23 notes

fuckyeahtoronto:

Del Newbigging, Alexander Wood, 2005
Such an embarrassingly bad sculpture.
In 1810, Wood found himself at the centre of a scandal when he investigated a rape case. The victim, referred to as “Miss Bailey”, came to Wood claiming that she did not know the identity of her attacker, however she had scratched her assailant’s penis during the assault. In order to identify the assailant, Wood personally inspected the genitals of a number of suspects for injury. Several contradictory rumours existed about Wood’s conduct during these inspections. It was even alleged that Wood fabricated the rape charge as an opportunity to fondle and seduce young men. To this day, the truth of what actually happened is unknown.
When confronted with the charges by his friend, Judge William Dummer Powell, Wood wrote back, “I have laid myself open to ridicule & malevolence, which I know not how to meet; that the thing will be made the subject of mirth and a handle to my enemies for a sneer I have every reason to expect.” Wood became the subject of ridicule and was tagged with the nickname “Molly Wood”, “Molly” then being a derisive slang expression for a homosexual man. John Beverley Robinson called Wood the “Inspector General of private Accounts.”
Judge Powell buried the potential sodomy charges on condition that Wood leave Upper Canada. Wood left for Scotland in October 1810.
Wood returned to York by 1812, resuming his prior appointment as a magistrate. He fought in the War of 1812 and was on the boards of several organizations. His life in York continued without incident until 1823, when Rev. John Strachan, a longtime friend of Wood’s, recommended him for a position on the 1812 War Claims Commission. Judge Powell was the appointing authority and refused Wood on moral grounds due to the 1810 scandal. Wood sued Powell for defamation and won, but Powell refused to pay and subsequently published a pamphlet attacking Wood even further.
Wood remained in York, continuing his service in civic duties for the next seventeen years. In 1827 he purchased 50 acres (0.2 km²) of land at Yonge and Carlton Streets, which was referred to as “Molly Wood’s Bush” throughout the 19th century.

Statue located at the corner of Church and Alexander Streets, in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley Village.

fuckyeahtoronto:

Del Newbigging, Alexander Wood, 2005

Such an embarrassingly bad sculpture.

In 1810, Wood found himself at the centre of a scandal when he investigated a rape case. The victim, referred to as “Miss Bailey”, came to Wood claiming that she did not know the identity of her attacker, however she had scratched her assailant’s penis during the assault. In order to identify the assailant, Wood personally inspected the genitals of a number of suspects for injury. Several contradictory rumours existed about Wood’s conduct during these inspections. It was even alleged that Wood fabricated the rape charge as an opportunity to fondle and seduce young men. To this day, the truth of what actually happened is unknown.

When confronted with the charges by his friend, Judge William Dummer Powell, Wood wrote back, “I have laid myself open to ridicule & malevolence, which I know not how to meet; that the thing will be made the subject of mirth and a handle to my enemies for a sneer I have every reason to expect.” Wood became the subject of ridicule and was tagged with the nickname “Molly Wood”, “Molly” then being a derisive slang expression for a homosexual man. John Beverley Robinson called Wood the “Inspector General of private Accounts.”

Judge Powell buried the potential sodomy charges on condition that Wood leave Upper Canada. Wood left for Scotland in October 1810.

Wood returned to York by 1812, resuming his prior appointment as a magistrate. He fought in the War of 1812 and was on the boards of several organizations. His life in York continued without incident until 1823, when Rev. John Strachan, a longtime friend of Wood’s, recommended him for a position on the 1812 War Claims Commission. Judge Powell was the appointing authority and refused Wood on moral grounds due to the 1810 scandal. Wood sued Powell for defamation and won, but Powell refused to pay and subsequently published a pamphlet attacking Wood even further.

Wood remained in York, continuing his service in civic duties for the next seventeen years. In 1827 he purchased 50 acres (0.2 km²) of land at Yonge and Carlton Streets, which was referred to as “Molly Wood’s Bush” throughout the 19th century.

Statue located at the corner of Church and Alexander Streets, in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley Village.

Filed under alexander wood toronto toronto history church street gay village church-wellesley upper canada canadian history

11 notes

Canadian performer Craig Russell interviewed on CBC in 1978. Russell made a career of impersonating entertainers such as Judy Garland, Bette Davis, Peggy Lee, Marlene Dietrich, and Mae West, seen on screen in his 1977 hit film Outrageous! A portrait of Russell was inducted into the CLGA’s National Portrait Collection in 2001.

clga.ca

Filed under craig russell cbc retrobites outrageous female impersonator mae west drag clga archive gay history lgbt history tbt 1970s

35 notes

“I become the gay man I am, not by expressing any innate desire (that’s homosexuality), but by joining a particular culture, by learning a particular language. I’ve always thought the phrase should be ‘going in,’ not ‘coming out.’ At whatever point or points we choose, we enter a gay culture which already exists, and in joining that culture we find ourselves amidst a variety of styles which our gay peers offer to us and demand from us. … More and more I actually think the phrase ‘being gay’ means ‘doing gay things’ — and for me, drag is one of them. It makes me feel gay. That is, when I put on that frock, I enter into a wealth of specifically gay feelings, gay games, gay possibilities.” 
Neil Bartlett on drag, The Body Politic No. 116, July 1985 >
clga.ca

“I become the gay man I am, not by expressing any innate desire (that’s homosexuality), but by joining a particular culture, by learning a particular language. I’ve always thought the phrase should be ‘going in,’ not ‘coming out.’ At whatever point or points we choose, we enter a gay culture which already exists, and in joining that culture we find ourselves amidst a variety of styles which our gay peers offer to us and demand from us. … More and more I actually think the phrase ‘being gay’ means ‘doing gay things’ — and for me, drag is one of them. It makes me feel gay. That is, when I put on that frock, I enter into a wealth of specifically gay feelings, gay games, gay possibilities.”

Neil Bartlett on drag, The Body Politic No. 116, July 1985 >

clga.ca

Filed under neil bartlett drag gay culture being gay homosexuality the body politic men in frocks